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Regal China Corporation

American
(1930–1992)

Old Fashioned Quaker Oats
1987

Porcelain
9.5 x 5.25 x 5.25 in.
GIft of Jerome S. Greenberg
1988.163

The Regal China Company was founded around 1930 by Herman Kravitz in Chicago. The company moved to Antioch (about fifty miles north) in 1940. Sometime in the 1940s, Regal was purchased by Royal China and Novelty Company, a distribution and sales organization. Royal used Regal to make the ceramic products that it sold (though the Regal mark was used as a brand for other pottery companies as well). In the late 1940s and early 1950s, Routh Van Telligen Bendel designed a series of character-based salt-and-pepper shakers as well as cookie jars and spice sets.

Starting in 1976, Regal began producing a cookie jar for Quaker Cereals. The Old Fashioned Quaker Oats jar celebrated the company’s hundredth anniversary and included the Famous Oatmeal Cookies recipe on the reverse side. Regal China was perhaps best known, after 1955, for their long line of Jim Beam decanters. In 1968, Regal China become a wholly owned subsidiary of the James Beam Distilling Company. The decanters were clever designs, and quite popular with collectors, but were nonetheless discontinued in the early 1970s. Regal continued to operate on a contract-only basis for a time, but ceased operations in 1992.

Billie Sessions, PhD.


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